British Steam - Military Connections

Great Western Railway, Southern Railway, British Railways & War Department Steam Locomotives

Fred Kerr

 
Date Published :
July 2018
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Language:
English
Series :
British Steam
Illustration :
250 illustrations
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Binding : Hardback
ISBN : 9781473853294

Dimensions : 9.75 X 7.5 inches
Stock Status : In stockPages : 240
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$50.00
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Overview
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In Great Britain there existed a practice of naming steam locomotives. The names chosen covered many and varied subjects, however a large number of those represented direct links with military personnel, regiments, squadrons, naval vessels, aircraft, battles and associated historic events. For example, all but one member of the famous ‘Royal Scot’ class were named in honor of British regiments. Also the Southern Railway created a ‘Battle of Britain’ class of locomotives, which were named in recognition of Battle of Britain squadrons, airfields, aircraft and personnel. In addition, the Great Western Railway renamed some of its engines after Second World War aircraft. The tradition has continued into modern times as the newly built ‘A1’ class locomotive is named ‘Tornado’ in recognition of the jet fighter aircraft of the same name. This generously illustrated publication highlights the relevant steam locomotives and additionally examines the origin of the military names.

About The Author
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Fred Kerr was born in Edinburgh in 1948 where he gained an interest in railway locomotives from both the LMSR and LNER companies whose services permeated the local network. When his parents moved to Corby in 1956 the local steelworks provided further interest from its mix of freight services, including seeing the last of the Beyer Garrets and the replacement Standard Class 9Fs whilst the industrial locomotives of the internal steelworks network offered further insight into the variety of steam locomotives. This was a time of change and during the 1960s the interest in locomotives included the new order of diesel and electric traction without reducing the interest in steam traction. Whilst his interest in Diesel Traction led to his early involvement with the Diesel & Electric Group and its preservation activities during the 1970s, his move to Southport in 1982 restored his opportunities to return to his first love of viewing steam locomotives at work and this album records some of the locations that he chose to visit and the locomotives that he was able to photograph.

Today his interest continues as a life member of the A4 Locomotive Society, Keighley & Worth Valley Railway and Ribble Steam Railway whilst he also support bodies concerned with preserving steam locomotives, diesel locomotives and infrastructure extensions.

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