British Railways Diesel Electric Classes 44 to 46

The Mighty Peaks of the Midland Main Line

Fred Kerr

Derby Works introduced the first mainline Diesel to UK service with the production of LMS 10000 in 1947, although mainline diesels had previously been tested on post-Grouping main lines prior to being exported.
Date Published :
January 2023
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Language:
English
Illustration :
215 color integrated
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Binding : Hardback
ISBN : 9781399089944

Dimensions : 11.1 X 8.5 inches
Stock Status : Not Yet Published. Available for Pre-OrderPages : 120
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$50.00
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Overview
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Derby Works introduced the first mainline Diesel to UK service with the production of LMS 10000 in 1947, although mainline diesels had previously been tested on post-Grouping main lines prior to being exported. When British Railways' Modernization Plan of 1955 was initiated by a Pilot Scheme to identify the best features for a future standard diesel fleet, Derby Works upgraded the design to produce its Type 4 - later Class 44 - locomotive that ultimately spawned 193 locomotives encompassing 3 variants which powered trains throughout the UK network.

Fred Kerr lived close to the Midland Main Line in Northamptonshire and observed the class from their introduction in May 1959 to their final withdrawal in the 1980s and has amassed a collection of images showing them working both freight and passenger duties throughout the UK but particularly on the Midland Main Line where the Class 45 variant held sway for nearly 25 years.

This album contains images from his extensive collection and, supported by a brief text, reflects the history of the 3 variants by showing the variety of services which they powered and the wide range of locations where class members were to be found.

About The Author
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Fred Kerr was born in Edinburgh in 1948 where he gained an interest in railway locomotives from both the LMSR and LNER companies whose services permeated the local network. When his parents moved to Corby in 1956 the local steelworks provided further interest from its mix of freight services, including seeing the last of the Beyer Garrets and the replacement Standard Class 9Fs whilst the industrial locomotives of the internal steelworks network offered further insight into the variety of steam locomotives. This was a time of change and during the 1960s the interest in locomotives included the new order of diesel and electric traction without reducing the interest in steam traction. While his interest in Diesel Traction led to his early involvement with the Diesel & Electric Group and its preservation activities during the 1970s, his move to Southport in 1982 restored his opportunities to return to his first love of viewing steam locomotives at work and this album records some of the locations that he chose to visit and the locomotives that he was able to photograph.

Today his interest continues as a life member of the A4 Locomotive Society, Keighley & Worth Valley Railway and Ribble Steam Railway whilst he also support bodies concerned with preserving steam locomotives, diesel locomotives and infrastructure extensions.

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